Jesus Christ the Fiery Serpent

Rejoice not thou, whole Palestina, because the rod of him that smote thee is broken: for out of the serpent's root shall come forth a cockatrice, and his fruit shall be a fiery flying serpent.

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The Book Of MARK

Audio Books - MARK

“The Book of MARK“

Verse 1: The beginning of the gospel of Jesus Christ, the Son Of God.

A. Mark begins the Gospel very abruptly and very authoritatively. He skips over Christ's birth and begins with the start of Christ's public ministry. Christ was approximately 30 years old when He began His ministry.
B.The proclamation of the Gospel did not begin with John the Baptist or even with Christ's public ministry. Some 800 year earlier God had sent Jonah to preach to the wicked city of Ninevah. Even before the foundation of the world, God had set up His salvation program ( Eph.1:4 and Rev. 13:8 ). Of courser, the Gospel came to its brightest declaration when Jesus appeared: He is the Gospel in that He came to pay for our sins; He is preeminent; He is before all things; He is the first born from the dead ( Col 1:18 )

Verse 2: As it is written in the Prophets: I send My messenger before your face, Who will prepare your way before you.

A. This verse comes from Malachi 3: 1-6. Please look up this passage; it refers to the coming of John the Baptist, who would prepare the way for Christ.

Verse 3: The voice of one crying in the wilderness: Prepare the way of the Lord, Make His paths stright.

A.This verse comes from Isaiah 40:1-11; it refers to Christ as the shepherd. He is coming to comfort His people. Vers 2 and 3 refer to the dual nature of the Gospel. The Gospel brings judgment on those who do not believe and mery on those who respond.

B. Josephus, the Jewish historian, said that when Vespasian the Emperor would come to town, that soldiers would be sent to prepare the road. Rocks would be removed. In the same way, John the Baptist came to prepare the way for Christ the coming King. John did not deal with rocks,but with the hardness of men's hearts.

C. The word wilderness in verse 3 has significant spiritual meaning. For 400 years Israel had been a spiritual wilderness. God had not sent them a prophet since the time of Malachi. They had rebelled against the Lord; and the Lord was silent! Now hope lies on the horizon with the coming of John the Baptist announcing Christ's coming

Verse 4: John came baptizing in the wilderness and preaching a baptism of repentance for remission of sins

A. John's baptism signified cleansing and purifying. In the old Testament there were four signs that related to cleansing. The first was circumcision. The foreskin of every male was cut off as part of the covenant relationship that God established with Israel. Circumcision was significant in that it anticipated the coming Messiah who would be cut off for our sins. Christ was cut off from God because of our sin (Isa. 53:8 ).

A second sign of cleansing was the burnt offering. The burnt offering pointed to the fact that Christ would endure Hell for us ( Heb. 10:1-18 ) also see further discussion on ( Mark 1:8 ).

A third sign of cleansing was the sacrifice of bulls, goats, and lambs, which foreshadowed Jesus Christ, the Lamb of God, Who was to sacrifice Himself for us (John 1:29 )

Fourthly, there was the sign of ceremonial washings (Heb. 9:10 ). Before a priest could offer a sacrifice, he had to wash his feet and hands. This depicts the spiritual cleansing that every believer experiences ( Titus 3:5 ).

B. John the Baptist preached a baptism of repentance for the forgiveness of sins. Baptism refers to cleansing, When we witness, we must always tell people to repent ( to turn away from ) their sins. Secondly, always give people hope that if they do repent they will be forgiven.John preached both repentance and forgiveness.

Verse 5: And all the land of Judea, and those from Jerusalem, went out to him and were all baptized by him in the Jordan River, confessing their sins.

A. Throught the preaching of John the Baptist, the Holy Spirit moved in a mighty way in Judea. Many were coming to listen to John and repenting of their sins and being baptized. There was obviously a lot of religious enthusiasm; in fact, so much, that John had to warn the Pharisees to change their actions in accordance with their repentance ( MT.3:7). Whenever a person truly repents there will be an observable change in his life.

Verse 6: Now John was clothed with camel's hair and with a leather belt around his waist, and he ate locusts and wild honey.

A. In the Scripture, sometimes God uses the lifestyle of a prophet to give us an idea of the character of the people he was prophesying to or of the judgment or blessing that wa to come upon them. For example, in the book of Hosea God told the Prophet Hosea to marry a prostitute and to have children by her. This was a reprehensible thing that God asked Hosea to do. In this real life situation God is illustrating the relationship between Himself and Israel. Israel is the spiritual bride of Christ, but she has gone off lusting after other gods. Israel has comitted spiritual adultery. Through Hosea's adulterous marriage, God graphically illustrated Israel's unfaithfulness.

Another example of this type of Symbolism can be found in Isaiah 20; there Isaiah walked naked and barefoot for three years, indicating that Assyria was going to defeat Egypt and Ethiopia and lead them away captive and naked.

B. With this perspective in mind, the clothing and foods to which John the Baptist was accustomed, have added signifiance. John's clothing was made of camel's hair. The camel was a ceremonially unclean animal (Lev. 11:4) just like a pig or a dog. The Jews were not to eat an unclean animal. These unclean animals were a picture of those who were under the curse of God. John's clothing was a realistic picture of Israel's rebellion against God (Rev. 21: 27). Israel was unclean in God's sight! Israel was under the curse of God.

C. John also ate wild honey. Honey in the Bible is usually a picture of salvation (Ex. 3:8, Is. 5:14-16, Ps. 81:16), but John ate wild honey. The word "wild" changes the whole picture. We see this, for example, in Isaiah 5:1-7, where God is talking about national Israel. He speaks of them as a vineyard which He planted. They were to yield (good) grapes, fruit which would please the Lord; but they yielded "wild grapes"; that is, they did what was evil in the Lord's sight. Isaiah said they would be punished for their rebellion. John's eating wild honey graphically showed that Israel had been feeding on other gospels and was in rebellion against the Lord.

D. John ate locusts. What do locusts signify in the Bible? Locusts always signify judgment. In Exodus 10:4-19 you find that one of the plagues against Egypt were locusts. This was a judgment against Egypt because of their sins. In Joel 1:4 God uses the figure of locusts to indicate judgment. In the final tribulation God uses the figure of locusts to indicate His judgment was upon the unsaved (Rev. 9:3)

John's eating of locusts signified that Israel was going to partake of God's wrath because of their unfaithfulness. When Christ went to the cross, the veil of the temple was torn in half. This was the end of the special place that Israel had held with the Lord. National Israel was no longer to be considered the chosen people. Roman 10:12,13 tells us, "For there is no distinction between Jew and Greek, for the same Lord over all is rich to all who call upon Him. For'whoever calls upon the name of the Lord shall ne saved.'"

The Book Of Daniel

The Seventy Weeks Of Daniel Nine

Audio Books - Danel Chapter Nine

One of the most intriguing passages in the Bible is that of Daniel 9:24-27. In this fascinating passage, God presents to us a vision that He had given to Daniel, in which He declares that certain events would take place during a period of 70 weeks. Scholars have worked long and hard to discover the import of these verses because they seem to offer a timetable concerning the coming of the Lord Jesus Christ.

A Most serious problem in interpreting this passage is to discover the meaning of the words of Daniel 9:25:

Daniel {9:25} Know therefore and understand, [that] from the going forth of the commandment to restore and to build Jerusalem unto the Messiah the Prince [shall be] seven weeks, and threescore and two weeks: the street shall be built again, and the wall, even in troublous times.

This event of the setting forth of the commandment to build Jerusalem appears to be the beginning of the 70 weeks or sevens. (The Hebrew word translated ​"week"​ also can be translated ​seven.​) In order to obtain any light from the rest of the passage it does appear that we must determine when this commandment was given.

Most students of the Bible, theologians, and commentaries understand the language of restoring and building Jerusalem to refer to a physical rebuilding of the literal city of Jerusalem. However, as we shall see, this kind of understanding is not required by the Bible, nor is it possible to find a solution to the 70 weeks by this means We shall discover that the Key to the 70 weeks is to understand that the Bible frequently uses Jerusalem as a figure or type of Christ's body of believers. The command to restore and to rebuild, therefore, will be found to mean that the Word of God was proclaimed so believers could come into the Kingdom of God. We shall develop this as we work out this study.

Ezra Returns to Jerusalem

Ezra, we shall see, meets all the requirements of Daniel 9. This solution relates to the return of Ezra to Jerusalem in the seventh year of King Artaxeres. This was the year 458 B.C., at which time Ezra returned to Jersalem to reestablish the Law. While preaching the Word of God or teaching the Law of God seems quite unrelated to building a city, we will see that the Bible does show us an intimated relationship between these two activities.

Therefore, we should first examine the Scriptures to show that a command to reestablish the Law was indeed equivalent to command to build Jerusalem.

Let us Look at Cyrus. As we study the language concerning him we will begin to see the close relationship that exists between the physical building of Jerusalem and the sending forth of the Gospel. While he was commanded to build Jerusalem and lay the foundation of the temple, the prophecy of Isaiah 44:28 speaks of Cyrus as God's shepherd. King Cyrus was not a shepherd. He was a King. When the Bible speaks of a shepherd, we immediately think of the Lord Jesus Christ, who was the Good Shepherd.

The fact is, while God is using the name Cyrus in Isaiah 44 and 45, and while in a physical sense the prophecy of Isaiah concerning Cyrus was fulfilled when the foundation of the temple was laid about 537B.C., in another sense the language is pointing altogether to the Lord Jesus Christ. God is using Cyrus as a type or figure of Christ. Even as Cyrus, the King of Persians, destroyed Babylon in 559 B.C., so Christ typified by Cyrus, destroyed the Kingdom of Satan by going to the cross. We know, of course, from such passages as Revelation 18, that the Kingdom of Satan is typified by Bablylon.

As Cyrus was commanded by God to build a literal house of God, so Christ was commanded by God to build a spiritual house. The temple and the city that He came to build is His body. We already see this in Isaiah 45:13 as God, in speakig of Cyrus declares: "He shall build my city, and he shall let go my captives, not for price nor reward, saith the Lord of hosts." He goes on in verse 17, "Iseael shall be saved in the Lord with an everlasting salvation.

Thus God is equating the building of a city with salvation, which is everlasting. We see, therefore, that when God speaks in the Book of Isaiah about Cyrus building a city and a temple, in its spiritual fulfillment Godhas in mind the Lord Jesus Christ, who builds Christ's body.

The Body of Christ-ATemple and a City

The concept that the temple of God and Jerusalem are figures of the body of Christ is amply seen in the Bible. We read, for example, in Isaiah 60:14, as God speaks of Israel and the fact that people from the world will come to build its walls:"...and they shall call thee, The city of the Lord, The Zion of the Holy One of Israel."

In Isaiah 62: 12 we read

And they shall call them the holy people, the redeemed of the Lord; and thou shalt be called sought out, a city not forsaken.

In both of these passages God is equating Israel with a city. In the New Testament we see the same truth as God uses the word Jerusalem. In Revelation 21 God presents the picture of the bride of Christ coming down out of heaven. The bride is called the Holy City, the New Jerusalem. The bride of Christ is a people--the people who are the body of Christ. The bride cannot be a physical city. Yet it is portrayed in Revelation 21 as a city with foundations, with gates and a wall.

Moreover, in the New Testament God speaks about building walls and building the ruins, and doing so in the context of sending forth the Gospel. In Acts 15, for example, we have the account of the leaders of the New Teatment church puzzling and wondering about what to do with the Gentiles who were coming into the body of Christ. Therefore, they held a council in Jerusalem to discuss this problem. Finally, it was James who stood up to speak on the phenomenon of the Gentiles coming in. He said in verse 15:

And to this agree the words of the prophets; as it is written, After this I will return, and will build again the tabernacle of David, which is fallen down; and I will build again the ruins thereof, and I will set it up: That the residue of men might seek after the Lord, and all the Gentiles, upon whom My Name is called, saith the Lord, who doeth all these things.

Daniel and God's Kingdom

The Seventy Weeks Of Daniel Nine

One of the most intriguing passages in the Bible is that of Daniel 9:24-27. In this fascinating passage, God presents to us a vision that He had given to Daniel, in which He declares that cer- tain events would take place during a period of 70 weeks. Scholars have worked long and hard to discover the import of these verses because they seem to offer a timetable concerning the coming of the Lord Jesus Christ.

A Most serious problem in interpreting this passage is to discover the meaning of the words of Daniel 9:25:

Daniel {9:25} Know therefore and understand, [that] from the going forth of the commandment to restore and to build Jerusalem unto the Messiah the Prince [shall be] seven weeks, and threescore and two weeks: the street shall be built again, and the wall, even in troublous times.

This event of the setting forth of the commandment to build Jerusalem appears to be the beginning of the 70 weeks or sevens. (The Hebrew word translated ​"week"​ also can be translated ​seven.​) In order to obtain any light from the rest of the passage it does appear that we must determine when this commandment was given.

Most students of the Bible, theologians, and commentaries understand the language of restoring and building Jerusalem to refer to a physical rebuilding of the literal city of Jerusalem. However, as we shall see, this kind of understanding is not required by the Bible, nor is it possible to find a solution to the 70 weeks by this means We shall discover that the Key to the 70 weeks is to understand that the Bible frequently uses Jerusalem as a figure or type of Christ's body of believers. The command to restore and to rebuild, therefore, will be found to mean that the Word of God was proclaimed so believers could come into the Kingdom of God. We shall develop this as we work out this study.

Ezra Returns to Jerusalem

Ezra, we shall see, meets all the requirements of Daniel 9. This solution relates to the return of Ezra to Jerusalem in the seventh year of King Artaxeres. This was the year 458 B.C., at which time Ezra returned to Jersalem to reestablish the Law. While preaching the Word of God or teaching the Law of God seems quite unrelated to building a city, we will see that the Bible does show us an intimated relationship between these two activities.

Therefore, we should first examine the Scriptures to show that a command to reestablish the Law was indeed equivalent to command to build Jerusalem.

Let us Look at Cyrus. As we study the language concerning him we will begin to see the close relationship that exists between the physical building of Jerusalem and the sending forth of the Gospel. While he was commanded to build Jerusalem and lay the foundation of the temple, the prophecy of Isaiah 44:28 speaks of Cyrus as God's shepherd. King Cyrus was not a shepherd. He was a King. When the Bible speaks of a shepherd, we immediately think of the Lord Jesus Christ, who was the Good Shepherd.

The fact is, while God is using the name Cyrus in Isaiah 44 and 45, and while in a physical sense the prophecy of Isaiah concerning Cyrus was fulfilled when the foundation of the temple was laid about 537B.C., in another sense the language is pointing altogether to the Lord Jesus Christ. God is using Cyrus as a type or figure of Christ. Even as Cyrus, the King of Persians, destroyed Babylon in 559 B.C., so Christ typified by Cyrus, destroyed the Kingdom of Satan by going to the cross. We know, of course, from such passages as Revelation 18, that the Kingdom of Satan is typified by Bablylon.