Jesus Christ the Fiery Serpent

Rejoice not thou, whole Palestina, because the rod of him that smote thee is broken: for out of the serpent's root shall come forth a cockatrice, and his fruit shall be a fiery flying serpent.


Weekly Bible Study

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The Book Of ISAIAH

Posted on August 18, 2013

CHAPTER I

Audio Books - Isaiah

ISAIAH

ISAIAH. also discussed duality in Isaiah 41:22, which says, “Let them bring them forth, and shew us what shall happen: let them shew the former things, what they be, that we may consider them, and know the latter end of them; or declare us things for to come.” There is the former and the latter end (which almost always refers to the end of this age). There is the former house and the latter house—or God’s physical temple and then the firstfruits who have been called and given God’s Holy Spirit (Haggai 2:5, 9).

Matthew 24 discusses the first century and the temple, but most of the focus is on the end time (see also 1 Corinthians 10:11). God also commanded Jeremiah and other prophets to write their messages in books for the end time (Jeremiah 30:2-3, 7-9). Daniel couldn’t even understand his message because it was for the end time (Daniel 12:9).

The house of Israel was conquered by the Assyrians, ancestors of modern-day Germany, in the years 721-718 B.C. The people of Israel were soon “driven from their own land and carried away captive to Assyria, which was located on the southern shores of the Caspian Sea. The Prophet Isaiah had already warned the Israelites that God was angry and would punish them for their sins if they didn’t repent.

Therefore the LORD was very angry with Israel, and removed them out of his sight: there was none left but the tribe of Judah only (2 Kings 17:18). Israel became known as the lost 10 tribes of Israel (biblical Judah is erroneously called “Israel” today). “Nebuchadnezzar of Babylon carried the Jews (Judah) captive to Babylon during the years 604 to 585 B.C. That was more than 130 years after Israel was conquered by the Assyrians.”

 

 

 

The Book Of Daniel

The Seventy Weeks Of Daniel Nine

Audio Books - Danel Chapter Nine

One of the most intriguing passages in the Bible is that of Daniel 9:24-27. In this fascinating passage, God presents to us a vision that He had given to Daniel, in which He declares that certain events would take place during a period of 70 weeks. Scholars have worked long and hard to discover the import of these verses because they seem to offer a timetable concerning the coming of the Lord Jesus Christ.

A Most serious problem in interpreting this passage is to discover the meaning of the words of Daniel 9:25:

Daniel {9:25} Know therefore and understand, [that] from the going forth of the commandment to restore and to build Jerusalem unto the Messiah the Prince [shall be] seven weeks, and threescore and two weeks: the street shall be built again, and the wall, even in troublous times.

This event of the setting forth of the commandment to build Jerusalem appears to be the beginning of the 70 weeks or sevens. (The Hebrew word translated ​"week"​ also can be translated ​seven.​) In order to obtain any light from the rest of the passage it does appear that we must determine when this commandment was given.

Most students of the Bible, theologians, and commentaries understand the language of restoring and building Jerusalem to refer to a physical rebuilding of the literal city of Jerusalem. However, as we shall see, this kind of understanding is not required by the Bible, nor is it possible to find a solution to the 70 weeks by this means We shall discover that the Key to the 70 weeks is to understand that the Bible frequently uses Jerusalem as a figure or type of Christ's body of believers. The command to restore and to rebuild, therefore, will be found to mean that the Word of God was proclaimed so believers could come into the Kingdom of God. We shall develop this as we work out this study.

Ezra Returns to Jerusalem

Ezra, we shall see, meets all the requirements of Daniel 9. This solution relates to the return of Ezra to Jerusalem in the seventh year of King Artaxeres. This was the year 458 B.C., at which time Ezra returned to Jersalem to reestablish the Law. While preaching the Word of God or teaching the Law of God seems quite unrelated to building a city, we will see that the Bible does show us an intimated relationship between these two activities.

Therefore, we should first examine the Scriptures to show that a command to reestablish the Law was indeed equivalent to command to build Jerusalem.

Let us Look at Cyrus. As we study the language concerning him we will begin to see the close relationship that exists between the physical building of Jerusalem and the sending forth of the Gospel. While he was commanded to build Jerusalem and lay the foundation of the temple, the prophecy of Isaiah 44:28 speaks of Cyrus as God's shepherd. King Cyrus was not a shepherd. He was a King. When the Bible speaks of a shepherd, we immediately think of the Lord Jesus Christ, who was the Good Shepherd.

The fact is, while God is using the name Cyrus in Isaiah 44 and 45, and while in a physical sense the prophecy of Isaiah concerning Cyrus was fulfilled when the foundation of the temple was laid about 537B.C., in another sense the language is pointing altogether to the Lord Jesus Christ. God is using Cyrus as a type or figure of Christ. Even as Cyrus, the King of Persians, destroyed Babylon in 559 B.C., so Christ typified by Cyrus, destroyed the Kingdom of Satan by going to the cross. We know, of course, from such passages as Revelation 18, that the Kingdom of Satan is typified by Bablylon.

As Cyrus was commanded by God to build a literal house of God, so Christ was commanded by God to build a spiritual house. The temple and the city that He came to build is His body. We already see this in Isaiah 45:13 as God, in speakig of Cyrus declares: "He shall build my city, and he shall let go my captives, not for price nor reward, saith the Lord of hosts." He goes on in verse 17, "Iseael shall be saved in the Lord with an everlasting salvation.

Thus God is equating the building of a city with salvation, which is everlasting. We see, therefore, that when God speaks in the Book of Isaiah about Cyrus building a city and a temple, in its spiritual fulfillment Godhas in mind the Lord Jesus Christ, who builds Christ's body.

The Body of Christ-ATemple and a City

The concept that the temple of God and Jerusalem are figures of the body of Christ is amply seen in the Bible. We read, for example, in Isaiah 60:14, as God speaks of Israel and the fact that people from the world will come to build its walls:"...and they shall call thee, The city of the Lord, The Zion of the Holy One of Israel."

In Isaiah 62: 12 we read

And they shall call them the holy people, the redeemed of the Lord; and thou shalt be called sought out, a city not forsaken.

In both of these passages God is equating Israel with a city. In the New Testament we see the same truth as God uses the word Jerusalem. In Revelation 21 God presents the picture of the bride of Christ coming down out of heaven. The bride is called the Holy City, the New Jerusalem. The bride of Christ is a people--the people who are the body of Christ. The bride cannot be a physical city. Yet it is portrayed in Revelation 21 as a city with foundations, with gates and a wall.

Moreover, in the New Testament God speaks about building walls and building the ruins, and doing so in the context of sending forth the Gospel. In Acts 15, for example, we have the account of the leaders of the New Teatment church puzzling and wondering about what to do with the Gentiles who were coming into the body of Christ. Therefore, they held a council in Jerusalem to discuss this problem. Finally, it was James who stood up to speak on the phenomenon of the Gentiles coming in. He said in verse 15:

And to this agree the words of the prophets; as it is written, After this I will return, and will build again the tabernacle of David, which is fallen down; and I will build again the ruins thereof, and I will set it up: That the residue of men might seek after the Lord, and all the Gentiles, upon whom My Name is called, saith the Lord, who doeth all these things.

Daniel and God's Kingdom

The Seventy Weeks Of Daniel Nine

One of the most intriguing passages in the Bible is that of Daniel 9:24-27. In this fascinating passage, God presents to us a vision that He had given to Daniel, in which He declares that cer- tain events would take place during a period of 70 weeks. Scholars have worked long and hard to discover the import of these verses because they seem to offer a timetable concerning the coming of the Lord Jesus Christ.

A Most serious problem in interpreting this passage is to discover the meaning of the words of Daniel 9:25:

Daniel {9:25} Know therefore and understand, [that] from the going forth of the commandment to restore and to build Jerusalem unto the Messiah the Prince [shall be] seven weeks, and threescore and two weeks: the street shall be built again, and the wall, even in troublous times.

This event of the setting forth of the commandment to build Jerusalem appears to be the beginning of the 70 weeks or sevens. (The Hebrew word translated ​"week"​ also can be translated ​seven.​) In order to obtain any light from the rest of the passage it does appear that we must determine when this commandment was given.

Most students of the Bible, theologians, and commentaries understand the language of restoring and building Jerusalem to refer to a physical rebuilding of the literal city of Jerusalem. However, as we shall see, this kind of understanding is not required by the Bible, nor is it possible to find a solution to the 70 weeks by this means We shall discover that the Key to the 70 weeks is to understand that the Bible frequently uses Jerusalem as a figure or type of Christ's body of believers. The command to restore and to rebuild, therefore, will be found to mean that the Word of God was proclaimed so believers could come into the Kingdom of God. We shall develop this as we work out this study.

Ezra Returns to Jerusalem

Ezra, we shall see, meets all the requirements of Daniel 9. This solution relates to the return of Ezra to Jerusalem in the seventh year of King Artaxeres. This was the year 458 B.C., at which time Ezra returned to Jersalem to reestablish the Law. While preaching the Word of God or teaching the Law of God seems quite unrelated to building a city, we will see that the Bible does show us an intimated relationship between these two activities.

Therefore, we should first examine the Scriptures to show that a command to reestablish the Law was indeed equivalent to command to build Jerusalem.

Let us Look at Cyrus. As we study the language concerning him we will begin to see the close relationship that exists between the physical building of Jerusalem and the sending forth of the Gospel. While he was commanded to build Jerusalem and lay the foundation of the temple, the prophecy of Isaiah 44:28 speaks of Cyrus as God's shepherd. King Cyrus was not a shepherd. He was a King. When the Bible speaks of a shepherd, we immediately think of the Lord Jesus Christ, who was the Good Shepherd.

The fact is, while God is using the name Cyrus in Isaiah 44 and 45, and while in a physical sense the prophecy of Isaiah concerning Cyrus was fulfilled when the foundation of the temple was laid about 537B.C., in another sense the language is pointing altogether to the Lord Jesus Christ. God is using Cyrus as a type or figure of Christ. Even as Cyrus, the King of Persians, destroyed Babylon in 559 B.C., so Christ typified by Cyrus, destroyed the Kingdom of Satan by going to the cross. We know, of course, from such passages as Revelation 18, that the Kingdom of Satan is typified by Bablylon.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Joseph Rossomando

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ISAIAH

The first verse of the Book of Isaiah states That Isaiah prophesied during the reigns of Uzziah (or Azariah), Jotham, Ahaz, and Hezekiah, the kings of Judah (Isaiah 1:1). Uzziah's reign was 52 years in the middle of the 8th century BC, and Isaiah must have begun his ministry a few years before Uzziah's death, probably in the 740s BC. Isaiah lived until the fourteenth year of Hezekiah's reign (who died 698 BC), and may have been contemporary for some years with Manasseh. Thus Isaiah may have prophesied for as long as 64 years.

Isaiah's wife was called "the prophetess" (Isaiah 8:3), either because she was endowed with the prophetic gift, like Deborah (Judges 4:4) and Huldah (2 Kings 22:14–20), or simply because she was the "wife of the prophet" (as he is named, for instance in Isaiah 38:1). The second interpretation, that it was simply an honorary title is likely. They had two sons, naming one Shear-Jashub, meaning "A remnant shall return" (Isaiah 7:3) and the younger, Maher-Shalal-Hash-Baz, meaning, "Spoil quickly, plunder speedily." (Isaiah 8:3) The book of Isaiah, along with the book of Jeremiah, is distinctive in the Hebrew bible for its direct portrayal of the "wrath of the Lord" as presented, for example, in Isaiah 10:19 stating, "Through the wrath of the Lord of hosts is the land darkened, and the people shall be as the fuel of the fire.

In early youth, Isaiah may have been moved by the invasion of Israel by the Assyrian monarch Tiglath-Pileser III (2 Kings 15:19); and again, twenty years later, when he had already entered his office, by the invasion of Tiglath-Pileser and his career of conquest. Ahaz, king of Judah, at this crisis refused to co-operate with the kings of Israel and Syria in opposition to the Assyrians, and was on that account attacked and defeated by Rezin of Damascus and Pekah of Israel (2 Kings 16:5; 2 Chronicles 28:5–6). Humbled, Ahaz sided with Assyria and sought the aid of Tiglath-Pileser against Israel and Syria. The consequence was that Rezin and Pekah were conquered and many of the people carried captive to Assyria (2 Kings 15:29, 16:9; 1 Chronicles 5:26).

Isaiah receives his vision of the Lord's house.
Soon after this, Shalmaneser V determined to subdue the kingdom of Israel, Samaria was taken and destroyed (722 BC). So long as Ahaz reigned, the kingdom of Judah was unmolested by the Assyrian power; but on his accession to the throne, Hezekiah, who was encouraged to rebel "against the king of Assyria" (2 Kings 18:7), entered into an alliance with the king of Egypt (Isaiah 30:2–4). This led the king of Assyria to threaten the king of Judah, and at length to invade the land. Sennacherib (701 BC) led a powerful army into Judah. Hezekiah was reduced to despair, and submitted to the Assyrians (2 Kings 18:14–16). But after a brief interval war broke out again. Again Sennacherib led an army into Judah, one detachment of which threatened Jerusalem (Isaiah 36:2–22; 37:8). Isaiah on that occasion encouraged Hezekiah to resist the Assyrians (37:1–7), whereupon Sennacherib sent a threatening letter to Hezekiah, which he "spread before the Lord" (37:14).

Then Isaiah the son of Amoz sent to Hezekiah, saying "Thus saith the lord God of Israel, That which thou hast prayed to me against Sennacherib king of Assyria I have heard.
This is the word that the lord hath spoken concerning him; The virgin daughter of Zion hath despised thee, and laughed thee to scorn; the daughter of Jerusalem hath shaken her head at thee.
Whom hast thou reproached and blasphemed? and against whom hast thou exalted thy voice, and lifted up thine eyes on high? even against the Holy One of Israel."
According to the account in 2 Kings 19 (and its derivative account in 2 Chronicles 32) the judgment of God now fell on the Assyrian army and wiped out 185,000 of its men. "Like Xerxes in Greece, Sennacherib never recovered from the shock of the disaster in Judah. He made no more expeditions against either the Southern Levant or Egypt.

The remaining years of Hezekiah's reign were peaceful (2 Chr 32:23–29). Isaiah probably lived to its close, and possibly into the reign of Manasseh, but the time and manner of his death are not specified in either the Bible or recorded history. There is a tradition (reported in both the Martyrdom of Isaiah and the Lives of the Prophets) that he suffered martyrdom by Manasseh due to pagan reaction.[citation needed]

Jehovah's Witnesses' use of Isaiah 43:10–12
In 1931, the name Jehovah's Witnesses was adopted by adherents of the Watch Tower Society, based on Isaiah 43:10. In the New World Translation, the verse reads: "'You are my witnesses,' is the utterance of Jehovah, 'even my servant whom I have chosen.

The Book Of ISAIAH

Isaiah wrote during the stormy period marking the expansion of the Assyrian empire and the decline of Israel. Under King Tiglath-Pileser III (745-727 b.c.) the Assyrians swept westward into Aram (Syria) and Canaan. About 733 the kings of Aram and Israel tried to pressure Ahaz king of Judah into joining a coalition against Assyria. Ahaz chose instead to ask Tiglath-Pileser for help, a decision condemned by Isaiah (see note on 7:1). Assyria did assist Judah and conquered the northern kingdom in 722-721. This made Judah even more vulnerable, and in 701 King Sennacherib of Assyria threatened Jerusalem itself (see 36:1 and note). The godly King Hezekiah prayed earnestly, and Isaiah predicted that God would force the Assyrians to withdraw from the city (37:6-7).

Nevertheless Isaiah warned Judah that her sin would bring captivity at the hands of Babylon. The visit of the Babylonian king's envoys to Hezekiah set the stage for this prediction (see 39:1,6 and notes). Although the fall of Jerusalem would not take place until 586 b.c., Isaiah assumes the destruction of Judah and proceeds to predict the restoration of the people from captivity (see 40:2-3 and notes). God would redeem his people from Babylon just as he rescued them from Egypt (see notes on 35:9; 41:14). Isaiah predicts the rise of Cyrus the Persian, who would unite the Medes and Persians and conquer Babylon in 539 (see 41:2 and note). The decree of Cyrus would allow the Jews to return home in 538/537, a deliverance that prefigured the greater salvation from sin through Christ (see 52:7 and note).

Themes and Theology

Isaiah is a book that unveils the full dimensions of God's judgment and salvation. God is "the Holy One of Israel" (see 1:4; 6:1 and notes) who must punish his rebellious people (1:2) but will afterward redeem them (41:14,16). Israel is a nation blind and deaf (6:9-10; 42:7), a vineyard that will be trampled (5:1-7), a people devoid of justice or righteousness (5:7; 10:1-2). The awful judgment that will be unleashed upon Israel and all the nations that defy God is called "the day of the Lord." Although Israel has a foretaste of that day (5:30; 42:25), the nations bear its full power (see 2:11,17,20 and note). It is a day associated in the NT with Christ's second coming and the accompanying judgment (see 24:1,21; 34:1-2 and notes). Throughout the book, God's judgment is referred to as "fire" (see 1:31; 30:33 and notes). He is the "Sovereign Lord" (see note on 25:8), far above all nations and rulers (40:15-24).

Yet God will have compassion on his people (14:1-2) and will rescue them from both political and spiritual oppression. Their restoration is like a new exodus (43:2,16-19; 52:10-12) as God redeems them (see 35:9; 41:14 and notes) and saves them (see 43:3; 49:8 and notes). Israel's mighty Creator (40:21-22; 48:13) will make streams spring up in the desert (32:2) as he graciously leads them home. The theme of a highway for the return of exiles is a prominent one (see 11:16; 40:3 and notes) in both major parts of the book. The Lord raises a banner to summon the nations to bring Israel home (see 5:26 and note).

Peace and safety mark this new Messianic age (11:6-9). A king descended from David will reign in righteousness (9:7; 32:1), and all nations will stream to the holy mountain of Jerusalem (see 2:2-4 and note). God's people will no longer be oppressed by wicked rulers (11:14; 45:14), and Jerusalem will truly be the "City of the Lord" (60:14).

The Lord calls the Messianic King "my servant" in chs. 42-53, a term also applied to Israel as a nation (see 41:8-9; 42:1 and notes). It is through the suffering of the servant that salvation in its fullest sense is achieved. Cyrus was God's instrument to deliver Israel from Babylon (41:2), but Christ delivered humankind from the prison of sin (52:13 -- 53:12). He became a "light for the Gentiles" (42:6), so that those nations that faced judgment (chs. 13 - 23) could find salvation (55:4-5). These Gentiles also became "servants of the Lord" (see 54:17 and note).

The Lord's kingdom on earth, with its righteous Ruler and his righteous subjects, is the goal toward which the book of Isaiah steadily moves. The restored earth and the restored people will then conform to the divine ideal, and all will result in the praise and glory of the Holy One of Israel for what he has accomplished.

Literary Features

Isaiah contains both prose and poetry; the beauty of its poetry is unsurpassed in the OT. The main prose material is found in chs. 36-39, the historical interlude that unites the two parts of the book (see Author). The poetic material includes a series of oracles in chs. 13 - 23. A taunting song against the king of Babylon is found in 14:4-23. Chs. 24-27 comprise an apocalyptic section stressing the last days (see note on 24:1 -- 27:13). A wisdom poem is found in 28:23-29 (also cf. 32:5-8). The song of the vineyard (5:1-7) begins as a love song as Isaiah describes God's relationship with Israel. Hymns of praise are given in 12:1-6 and 38:10-20, and a national lament occurs in 63:7 -- 64:12. The poetry is indeed rich and varied, as is the prophet's vocabulary (he uses a larger vocabulary of Hebrew words than any other OT writer).

One of Isaiah's favorite techniques is personification. The sun and moon are ashamed (24:23), while the desert and parched land rejoice (see 35:1 and note) and the mountains and forests burst into song (44:23). The trees "clap their hands" (55:12). A favorite figure is the vineyard, which represents Israel (5:7). Treading the winepress is a picture of judgment (see 63:3 and note), and to drink God's "cup of wrath" is to stagger under his punishment (see 51:17 and note). Isaiah uses the name "Rock" to describe God (17:10), and animals such as Leviathan and Rahab represent nations (see 27:1; 30:7; 51:9).

The power of Isaiah's imagery is seen in 30:27-33, and he makes full use of sarcasm in his denunciation of idols in 44:9-20. A forceful example of wordplay appears in 5:7 (see note there), and one finds inversion in 6:10 (see note there; see also note on 16:7) and alliteration and assonance in 24:16-17 (see note there). The "overwhelming scourge" of 28:15,18 is an illustration of mixed metaphor. Isaiah often alludes to earlier events in Israel's history, especially the exodus from Egypt. The crossing of the Red Sea forms the background for 11:15 and 43:2,16-17, and other allusions occur in 4:5-6; 31:5; 37:36 (see notes on these verses). The overthrow of Sodom and Gomorrah is referred to in 1:9, and Gideon's victory over Midian is mentioned in 9:4; 10:26 (see also 28:21). Several times Isaiah draws upon the song of Moses in Dt 32 (compare 1:2 with Dt 32:1; 30:17 with Dt 32:30; and 43:11,13 with Dt 32:39). Isaiah, like Moses, called the nation to repentance and to faith in a holy, all-powerful God. See also note on 49:8. The refrain in 48:22 and 57:21 divides the last 27 chapters into three sections of nine chapters each (40-48; 49-57; 58-66; see Outline). Outline Part 1: The Book of Judgment (chs. 1 - 39) Messages of Rebuke and Promise (chs. 1-6) Introduction: Charges against Judah for Breaking the Covenant (ch. 1) The Future Discipline and Glory of Judah and Jerusalem (chs. 2-4) Jerusalem's future blessings (2:1-5) The Lord's discipline of Judah (2:6;4:1) The restoration of Zion (4:2-6) The Nation's Judgment and Exile (ch. 5) Isaiah's Unique Commission (ch. 6) Prophecies Occasioned by the Aramean and Israelite Threat against Judah (chs. 7-12) Ahaz Warned Not to Fear the Aramean and Israelite Alliance (ch. 7) Isaiah's Son and David's Son (8:1;9:7) Judgment against Israel (9:8;10:4) The Assyrian Empire and the Davidic Kingdom (10:5;12:6) The destruction of Assyria (10:5-34) The establishment of the Davidic king and his kingdom (ch. 11) Songs of joy for deliverance (ch. 12) Judgment against the Nations (chs. 13-23) Against Assyria and Its Ruler (13:1;14:27) Against Philistia (14:28-32) Against Moab (chs. 15-16) Against Aram and Israel (ch. 17) Against Cush (ch. 18) Against Egypt and Cush (chs. 19-20) Against Babylon (21:1-10) Against Dumah (Edom) (21:11-12) Against Arabia (21:13-17) Against the Valley of Vision (Jerusalem) (ch. 22) Against Tyre (ch. 23) Judgment and Promise (the Lord's Kingdom) (chs. 24-27) Universal Judgments for Universal Sin (ch. 24) Deliverance and Blessing (ch. 25) Praise for the Lord's Sovereign Care (ch. 26) Israel's Enemies Punished but Israel's Remnant Restored (ch. 27) Six Woes: Five on the Unfaithful in Israel and One on Assyria (chs. 28-33) Woe to Ephraim (Samaria) -- and to Judah (ch. 28) Woe to David's City, Jerusalem (29:1-14) Woe to Those Who Rely on Foreign Alliances (29:15-24) Woe to the Obstinate Nation (ch. 30) Woe to Those Who Rely on Egypt (chs. 31-32) Woe to Assyria -- but Blessing for God's People (ch. 33) More Prophecies of Judgment and Promise (chs. 34-35) The Destruction of the Nations and the Avenging of God's People (ch. 34) The Future Blessings of Restored Zion (ch. 35) A Historical Transition from the Assyrian Threat to the Babylonian Exile (chs. 36-39) Jerusalem Preserved from the Assyrian Threat (chs. 36-37) The siege of Jerusalem by Sennacherib and the Assyrian army (ch. 36) The Lord's deliverance of Jerusalem (ch. 37) The Lord's Extension of Hezekiah's Life (ch. 38) The Babylonian Exile Predicted (ch. 39) Part 2: The Book of Comfort (chs. 40-66) The Deliverance and Restoration of Israel (chs. 40-48) The Coming of the Victorious God (40:1-26) Unfailing Strength for the Weary Exiles (40:27-31) The Lord of History (41:1;42:9) Praise and Exhortation (42:10-25) The Regathering and Renewal of Israel (43:1;44:5) The Only God (44:6;45:25) The Lord's Superiority over Babylon's Gods (ch. 46) The Fall of Babylon (ch. 47) The Lord's Exhortations to His People (ch. 48) The Servant's Ministry and Israel's Restoration (chs. 49-57) The Call and Mission of the Servant (49:1-13) The Repopulation of Zion (49:14-26) Israel's Sin and the Servant's Obedience (ch. 50) The Remnant Comforted Because of Their Glorious Prospect (51:1;52:12) The Sufferings and Glories of the Lord's Righteous Servant (52:13;53:12) The Future Glory of Zion (ch. 54) The Lord's Call to Salvation and Covenant Blessings (55:1;56:8) The Condemnation of the Wicked in Israel (56:9;57:21) Everlasting Deliverance and Everlasting Judgment (chs. 58-66) False and True Worship (ch. 58) Zion's Confession and Redemption (ch. 59) Zion's Peace and Prosperity (ch. 60) The Lord's Favor (ch. 61) Zion's Restoration and Glory (62:1;63:6) Prayer for Divine Deliverance (63:7;64:12) The Lord's Answer: Mercy and Judgment (ch. 65) Judgment for False Worshipers and Blessing for True Worshipers (ch. 66)